Public Sector Reforms in Developing Countries (inbunden)
Format
Inbunden (Hardback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
220
Utgivningsdatum
2014-04-04
Förlag
Routledge
Medarbetare
Huque, Ahmed Shafiqul
Illustratör/Fotograf
9 black & white tables 9 black & white illustrations 9 black & white line drawings
Illustrationer
9 Line drawings, black and white; 9 Tables, black and white; 9 Illustrations, black and white
Dimensioner
234 x 155 x 18 mm
Vikt
454 g
Antal komponenter
1
Komponenter
,
ISBN
9780415858564
Public Sector Reforms in Developing Countries (inbunden)

Public Sector Reforms in Developing Countries

Paradoxes and Practices

Inbunden Engelska, 2014-04-04
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The underpinning assumption of public management in the developing world as a process of planned change is increasingly being recognized as unrealistic. In reality, the practice of development management is characterized by processes of mutual adjustment among individuals, agencies, and interest groups that can constrain behaviour, as well as provide incentives for collaborative action. Paradoxes inevitably emerge in policy network practice and design. The ability to manage government departments and operations has become less important than the ability to navigate the complex world of interconnected policy implementation processes. Public sector reform policies and programmes, as a consequence, are a study in the complexities of the institutional and environmental context in which these reforms are pursued. Building on theory and practice, this book argues that advancing the theoretical frontlines of development management research and practice can benefit from developing models based on innovation, collaboration and governance. The themes addressed in Public Sector Reforms in Developing Countries will enable public managers in developing countries cope in uncertain and turbulent environments as they seek optimal fits between their institutional goals and environmental contingencies.
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Public Sector Reforms in Developing Countries moves the study of contemporary reform out of the Western democracies to consider the impact of various ideas about management on public administration in other parts of the world. This is an extremely useful and informative collection of papers that should be read by scholars in administration and those in development. B. Guy Peters, Professor, University of Pittsburgh, USA

Övrig information

Charles Conteh is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, Brock University, Canada Ahmed Shafiqul Huque is Professor of Political Science at McMaster University, Canada

Innehållsförteckning

Introduction Part I: Conceptual Overview 2. Public Management Reform in Developing Countries: Contradictions and the Inclusive State 2. An Appraisal of the New Public Governance as a "Paradigm" of Public Sector Reform in Africa Part II: Case Studies on Participation 3. Institutional Reforms in Irrigation Sector of Punjab of Pakistan: Moving towards Participatory Irrigation Management 4. Partnerships between Governments and Nongovernmental Organizations In Brazil: Progress and Setbacks Part III: Case Studies on Decentralization 5. Paradoxes of Decentralisation Reform at the Periphery: Evidence of Decentralised Drugs Policy in Thailand 6. The Political Context of Decentralization: Reflections on South Asia 7. Decentralization in Turkey (2002-2010): Achievements and Shortcomings Part IV: Public Sector Reform: Prospects and Challenges 8. The Elusive Goal of 'Perfect Administration': An Analysis of Public Sector Reform in Jamaica 9. The Internationalization of Public Performance Management and Budgeting: Limitations in the Gulf States 10. Where Private Sector Solutions are not Enough: The Case for a Developmental Public Sector in Africa Conclusion