College (häftad)
Format
Häftad (Paperback / softback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
264
Utgivningsdatum
2014-12-28
Upplaga
Revised ed
Utmärkelser
Winner of O.L. Davis Jr. AATC Outstanding Book in Education Award 2013; Commended for PROSE Awards: Education 2012; Short-listed for Choice Magazine Outstanding Reference/Academic Book Award 2013
Förlag
Princeton University Press
Originalspråk
English
Medarbetare
Delbanco, Andrew (afterword)
Illustrationer
Black & white illustrations
Dimensioner
213 x 137 x 18 mm
Vikt
363 g
Antal komponenter
1
Komponenter
401:B&W 5.5 x 8.5 in or 216 x 140 mm (Demy 8vo) Perfect Bound on Creme w/Matte Lam
ISBN
9780691165516

College

What It Was, Is, and Should Be - Updated Edition

Häftad,  Engelska, 2014-12-28
218
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As the commercialization of American higher education accelerates, more and more students are coming to college with the narrow aim of obtaining a preprofessional credential. The traditional four-year college experience--an exploratory time for students to discover their passions and test ideas and values with the help of teachers and peers--is in danger of becoming a thing of the past. In College, prominent cultural critic Andrew Delbanco offers a trenchant defense of such an education, and warns that it is becoming a privilege reserved for the relatively rich. In describing what a true college education should be, he demonstrates why making it available to as many young people as possible remains central to America's democratic promise. In a brisk and vivid historical narrative, Delbanco explains how the idea of college arose in the colonial period from the Puritan idea of the gathered church, how it struggled to survive in the nineteenth century in the shadow of the new research universities, and how, in the twentieth century, it slowly opened its doors to women, minorities, and students from low-income families. He describes the unique strengths of America's colleges in our era of globalization and, while recognizing the growing centrality of science, technology, and vocational subjects in the curriculum, he mounts a vigorous defense of a broadly humanistic education for all. Acknowledging the serious financial, intellectual, and ethical challenges that all colleges face today, Delbanco considers what is at stake in the urgent effort to protect these venerable institutions for future generations. In a new afterword, Delbanco responds to recent developments--both ominous and promising--in the changing landscape of higher education.
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Winner of the 2013 O.L. Davis, Jr. Book Award, American Association for Teaching and Curriculum. Winner of the 2013 Gold Medal in Education II (Commentary/Theory), Independent Publisher Book Awards. Winner of the 2013 Philip E. Frandson Award for Literature in the Field of Continuing Education, University Professional and Continuing Higher Education Association. Finalist for the 2012 Book of the Year Award in Education, ForeWord Reviews. One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2013. Honorable Mention for the 2012 Award for Best Professional/Scholarly Book in Education, Association of American Publishers. "At a time when many are trying to reduce the college years to a training period for economic competition, Delbanco reminds readers of the ideal of democratic education... The American college is too important 'to be permitted to give up on its own ideals,' Delbanco writes. He has underscored these ideals by tracing their history. Like a great teacher, he has inspired us to try to live up to them."--Michael S. Roth, New York Times Book Review "The book does have a thesis, but it is not thesis-ridden. It seeks to persuade not by driving a stake into the opponent's position or even paying much attention to it, but by offering us examples of the experience it celebrates. Delbanco's is not an argument for, but a display of, the value of a liberal arts education."--Stanley Fish, New York Times "A lucid, fair, and well-informed account of the problems, and it offers a full-throated defense of the idea that you don't go to college just to get a job. Delbanco's brevity, wit, and curiosity about the past and its lessons for the present give his book a humanity all too rare in the literature on universities."--Anthony Grafton, New York Review of Books "[I]nsightful and rewarding... Delbanco's evocation of these nineteenth-century precedents is of central importance, for they allow him to demonstrate that liberal education, far from being an elite indulgence, is inseparable from our nation's most cherished and deeply rooted democratic precepts. In the face of today's hyper-accelerated, ultra-competitive global society, the preservation of opportunities for self-development and autonomous reflection is a value we underestimate at our peril."--Richard Wolin, The Nation "Has the democratic ideal of a classical education, open to rich and poor alike, become a thing of the past? That's the scenario proposed by esteemed literary scholar Delbanco in this engaging assessment of how American higher education has lost its way... He makes a strong case that the purely materialist approach to education assures that the disparity between rich and poor students only widens, with 'merit-based' financial aid and scholarships all going disproportionately to students from families with money... This is an impassioned call for a corrupt system to heal itself."--Kirkus Reviews "To renew higher education in an age of secular pluralism, Delbanco summons his colleagues to a defense of the university's role in fostering humane and democratic impulses... Delbanco's agenda for reform--curricular, pedagogical, financial, and technological--will stimulate a much-needed national dialogue."--Bryce Christensen, Booklist "Delbanco explores American higher education in a manner befitting a scholar of Melville and the Puritans, with a humanist's belief in lessons from history and in asking what the right thing is to do... College has always been a microcosm of society, so a book about it is also about how we're doing as a country."--Clare Malone, American Prospect "A thoughtful and insightful look at American college's exceptionalism and pitfalls... Whether you're in college, thinking about college or just paying for it, it's a good read to help better understand one of America's oldest

Övrig information

Andrew Delbanco is the Mendelson Family Chair of American Studies and the Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University. His books include Melville: His World and Work (Vintage), which won the Lionel Trilling Award and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in biography. He received the 2011 National Humanities Medal for his writing, which spans from the literature of Melville and Emerson to contemporary issues in higher education.

Innehållsförteckning

Preface to the Paperback Edition xi Preface xvii Introduction 1 One What Is College For? 9 Two Origins 36 Three From College to University 67 Four Who Went? Who Goes? Who Pays? 102 Five Brave New World 125 Six What Is to Be Done? 150 Afterword to the New Paperback Edition 179 Acknowledgments 187 Notes 191 Index 223